Suicide and Self-Harm Is Increasing Among Teen Girls, Study Finds

December 08, 2017
News Type:  Weekly Spark, Weekly Spark News


Suicide attempts and self-harm among teenage girls have increased, according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Researchers analyzed 2001 to 2015 data on emergency department visits for nonfatal self-inflicted injuries among youth ages 10 to 24. They found that rates for males remained stable throughout that time period, and increased significantly among females starting in 2009. Rates among girls ages 10 to 14 rose most sharply, nearly tripling from 2009 to 2015. Lead study author Melissa Mercado cautioned that these rates could be an underestimate because the study only included data on self-inflicted injuries treated in emergency departments and did not examine cases treated in other settings. The authors emphasized the need for a comprehensive suicide and self-harm prevention approach that includes supporting at-risk youth, promoting social connectedness, and teaching coping and problem-solving skills.

Spark Extra! Read the study abstract.

Populations:  Youth, Adolescents
About Suicide:  Behavioral Health Disorders, Self-Injury (NSSI), Suicidal Thoughts and Behavior, Attempts