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Community Health Network

Program Name 
Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

Community Health Network’s Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth will prevent suicide attempts and deaths of Indiana youth ages 10-24. Healthcare and youth serving organizations will be trained to identify and refer at-risk youth. Crisis, telepsychiatry and intensive care coordination services will support over 600 primary care physicians, 11 emergency departments and 13 hospitals. Over 5,000 youth per year will receive evidence-based assessments and treatments.

The Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction designated Community Health Network as the lead entity because it has the most comprehensive youth services in the state and it was already working to become the 1st large health system in the country to fully implement the Zero Suicides model. The Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth project will leverage the best practice toolkit developed by the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. Youth, families, survivors, youth serving organizations, policy makers, emergency departments, medical-surgical units, primary care, general medical providers, behavioral health entities and crisis services will:

 

  • Promote systems-level change among youth-serving agencies and health care providers
  • Improve the preparedness of youth-serving organizations (schools, foster care systems and juvenile justice programs) to identify risk and provide timely intervention and referrals
  • Improve the preparedness of clinical service providers (primary and behavioral) to assess, manage, and treat youth at risk for suicide and provide timely intervention and referrals, while adopting an institution-wide cultural adoption of the Zero Suicides in Healthcare model
  • Improve access to timely care for youth in suicidal crisis
  • Strengthen care coordination and continuity of care for youth at risk of suicide
  • Evaluate the impact of the project, disseminate lessons learned, and replicate the model

Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth is aligned with the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. Suicide prevention resources will be provided to increase the number of persons in youth-serving organizations throughout the state trained to identify/refer youth at risk for suicide and to advertise the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. It will increase the number of clinical service providers trained to assess, manage, and treat youth at risk for suicide. Continuity of care
and follow-up of youth identified at risk for suicide discharged from emergency departments and inpatient psychiatric units will be improved. Outreach will engage youth at higher risk such as individuals who are homeless, ethnic minorities, in foster care, in the juvenile justice system and LGBTQ. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-34 year olds and the third among 10-14 year olds. The CDC’s 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey revealed that the percentage of Indiana students actually attempting suicide was the 2nd highest among the 43 states surveyed, demonstrating the critical need for Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth.

Suicide among college and university students in the United States

This information sheet summarizes the data available on suicidal thoughts, attempts, and deaths, and describes risk and protective factors that are common among college and university students. Since there are no national databases or registries, and no single study compiling and analyzing suicide deaths, attempts, and/or thoughts among college and university students, the data presented here are from sources that have been selected as the most comprehensive and up to date.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Suicide prevention resources for adult corrections

This sheet lists written materials, trainings, organizations, and websites that contain information on suicide prevention in adult correctional facilities. It can be used with the Suicide Prevention Resource Center's information sheet The Role of Adult Correctional Officers in Preventing Suicide or on its own by correctional officers, administrators, and health/mental health care providers in adult correctional facilities, as well as by suicide prevention professionals interested in working with adult correctional facilities.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

The role of adult correctional officers in preventing suicide (SPRC Customized Information Series)

This brief sheet provides basic information to help correctional officers in facilities for adults to recognize and respond to people who may be suicidal or at high risk. (An unformatted version of the sheet that includes references is available.) An accompanying list of resources is also available.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Help a friend in need

Help A Friend In Need is a community guide for Facebook users to help college students and young adults identify potential warning signs that a friend might be in emotional distress and in need of help. The guide provides recommendations about how to recognize content on Facebook that may signal emotional distress, as well as advice on how to talk to a friend who may be struggling and how to connect them to help.

Creator 
The Jed Foundation, Facebook, the Clinton Foundation
Publisher 
The Jed Foundation
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Work and suicide prevention position statement

This position statement seeks to address the significant gaps exist in the understanding of the relationship between work and suicide, which can limit prevention efforts. The statement was released on February 20, 2014 at the Construction Industry inaugural Mental Health Conference in Brisbane. Suicide Prevention Australia (SPA) calls on organizations of all sizes to implement workplace policies and programs that promote a mentally healthy workforce and prevent suicide behaviors. The position statement also provides recommendations for employers to take action to prevent suicide.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Australia
Publisher 
Suicide Prevention Australia
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

A Manager’s Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace: 10 Action Steps for Dealing with the Aftermath of Suicide

Setting 
Workplaces
Type of Program 
Guidelines & Protocols
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
1.4, 2.1, 10.1, 10.2, 10.4
Description 

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace provides clear steps for postvention, giving leadership a sense of how to: provide an immediate response to the traumatic event; follow a short-term recovery plan; and develop long-term strategies for helping employees cope. The publication provides succinct procedures with checklists and flow charts and serves as a go-to guide for people dealing with the crisis of suicide. The goal of the guide is to help reduce the impact of the suicide event by offering a blueprint for handling these challenging situations. In addition to providing immediate access to clear steps to take for moving forward in the wake of a traumatic event, the guide helps workplaces plan to move from a solely reactive position to a proactive approach, including policy development and employee training. It is available online without charge from the Carson J Spencer Foundation.

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace provides clear steps for postvention, giving leadership a sense of how to: provide an immediate response to the traumatic event; follow a short-term recovery plan; and develop long-term strategies for helping employees cope. The publication provides succinct procedures with checklists and flow charts and serves as a go-to guide for people dealing with the crisis of suicide. The goal of the guide is to help reduce the impact of the suicide event by offering a blueprint for handling these challenging situations.

Program Description 

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace provides clear steps for postvention, giving leadership a sense of how to: provide an immediate response to the traumatic event; follow a short-term recovery plan; and develop long-term strategies for helping employees cope. The publication provides succinct procedures with checklists and flow charts and serves as a go-to guide for people dealing with the crisis of suicide. The goal of the guide is to help reduce the impact of the suicide event by offering a blueprint for handling these challenging situations. In addition to providing immediate access to clear steps to take for moving forward in the wake of a traumatic event, the guide helps workplaces plan to move from a solely reactive position to a proactive approach, including policy development and employee training.

The guide was created through the collaboration of numerous experts and organizations, including the American Association of Suicidology, the Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, and the Carson J Spencer Foundation. Collaborators worked to create a set of guidelines that are useful across varied types of workplaces, and they expect a range of individuals within these organizations and companies to find the information immediately helpful. This guide can be useful to managers at all levels–from the CEO of a large business to a front-line supervisor at a small organization.

Objectives 

Managers who use the guide and follow the checklists will have greater ability to:
1. Reduce suicide risk amongst employees after a suicide death.
2. Promote healthy grieving and to link those in need to resources.
3. Transition from suicide postvention to suicide prevention.

Implementation Essentials 

Managers who use the guide should be familiar with resources and services for employees who may need help.

Contact Information 
Sally Spencer-Thomas
CEO & Co-Founder
Carson J Spencer Foundation
1385 South Colorado Boulevard, Suite A-316
Denver, CO 80222
Phone: 303-219-5045
Organization 
Carson J Spencer Foundation
Costs 

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplaceis available online at no charge. 

First Posted 
Jan 17 2014

JedCampus

Setting 
Colleges and Universities
Type of Program 
Guidelines & Protocols
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
5.2, 8.3 (2012)
Description 

JedCampus is an online self-assessment program that provides colleges with a tool to evaluate their compliance with the elements of the Jed Foundation/SPRC Model for Mental Health Promotion and Suicide Prevention (including strategic planning). Schools that meet minimum standards across the following eight domains receive a JedCampus seal: (1) strategic planning, (2) Identifying students at risk, (3) educate gatekeepers on campus, (4) provide mental Health services, (5) restrict access to potentially lethal means, (6) create and follow crisis management procedures, (7) increase help-seeking behavior, and (8) develop life skills/promote social networks. JedCampus is available from the Jed Foundation for a fee.

Program Description 

JedCampus is an online self-assessment program that provides colleges with a tool to evaluate their compliance with the elements of the Jed Foundation (TJF)/Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) model for college- and university-based mental health promotion and suicide prevention (including strategic planning). Schools will be given guidance in planning and programming as part of the program and schools that are in adequate compliance with the model will be awarded a JedCampus seal. The goal is to create positive movement toward greater adoption of the elements of this public/community health model. 

Further goals of the problem include: educating higher administration in colleges as to the importance of supporting student emotional health and wellbeing, as well as campus suicide prevention activities; alerting parents of young people applying for college about the nature and breadth of support services on various college campuses; and finally, as sufficient data is collected, to evaluate the impact of mental health programming on suicide and hospitalization rates among students and to explore the relationship between campus mental health programming and student retention. Schools that meet minimum standards across the following eight domains receive a JedCampus seal: (1) strategic planning, (2) Identifying students at risk, (3) educate gatekeepers on campus, (4) provide mental Health services, (5) restrict access to potentially lethal means, (6) create and follow crisis management procedures, (7) increase help-seeking behavior, and (8) develop life skills/promote social networks.

Elements of the TJF/SPRC model were reviewed and converted to survey questions with the input of an advisory panel of mental health experts, college counseling directors, and leaders and student affairs leadership. The survey was then piloted in a project with the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). The survey was reviewed again with higher education and college counseling leaders and input was received from theory of change experts from the Poses Family Foundation. 

Objectives 

Colleges and universities that use JedCampus will have greater:
1. Understanding of the degree of their compliance with the Jed Foundation/SPRC model among colleges.
2. Ability to aid families in the college selection process.
3. Ability to evaluate impact of model compliance on suicide rates, hospital admissions and days, and college retention/graduation rates.

Implementation Essentials 
  • Colleges and universities that use JedCampus should be knowledgeable about The Jed Foundation/SPRC model for mental health promotion and suicide prevention.
Contact Information 
Victor Schwartz, MD
Medical Director, The Jed Foundation
1140 Broadway, suite 803
New York, NY 10001
Voice: 212-647-7544
Website (Foundation): www.jedfoundation.org
Website (Program): www.jedcampus.org
Organization 
The Jed Foundation
Costs 

JedCampus costs $650. This includes submission of the survey, feedback report, and feedback call and seal if school is eligible. This price may increase but may also be adjusted for schools that cannot afford it.

First Posted 
Nov 12 2013

Accessing data about suicidal behavior among college and university students

This fact sheet is associated with the SPRC Training Institute course, Locating and Using Data for Suicide Prevention. It provides information on considerations in using existing campus data and key sources of campus-related suicide data.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Date published 
2012
Full Text Online 
Yes

Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT)

Type 
Education & Training
Organization 
Drexel University
Description 

Attachment-Based Family Therapy (ABFT) is a treatment for adolescents ages 12-18 that is designed to treat clinically diagnosed major depressive disorder, eliminate suicidal ideation, and reduce dispositional anxiety. The model is based on an interpersonal theory of depression, which proposes that the quality of family relationships may precipitate, exacerbate, or prevent depression and suicidal ideation. In this model, ruptures in family relationships, such as those due to abandonment, neglect, or abuse or a harsh and negative parenting environment, influence the development of adolescent depression. Families with these attachment ruptures lack the normative secure base and safe haven context needed for an adolescent's healthy development, including the development of emotion regulation and problem-solving skills. These adolescents may experience depression resulting from the attachment ruptures themselves or from their inability to turn to the family for support in the face of trauma outside the home. ABFT aims to strengthen or repair parent-adolescent attachment bonds and improve family communication. As the normative secure base is restored, parents become a resource to help the adolescent cope with stress, experience competency, and explore autonomy. The treatment manual is available for $69.95, or $49.95 for members of the American Psychological Association. Additional training and resources are available from the program developer. Check the NREPP website for contact information.

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