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Pennsylvania Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Program Name 
Suicide Prevention in Schools and Colleges
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The Suicide Prevention in Schools and Colleges initiative will implement suicide prevention and early intervention strategies for youth ages 10-25 across Pennsylvania. The grant will provide gatekeeper training, suicide risk management training, standardized screening, and training in empirically supported treatments. The project will raise awareness, increase identification of at risk youth, facilitate referrals to treatment, and improve treatment outcomes.

The problem addressed by our proposal is that suicide risk is being under identified in Pennsylvania’s schools, community colleges, and universities. There is no systematic training for professionals or standardized screening procedures to identify youth at risk. Therefore, too many young people are not identified and too many of those who are high risk are not being adequately screened, and not receiving treatment and support.

There are 500 school districts and 181 community colleges and universities in Pennsylvania. In the general state population, there are 2,570,000 individuals age 10-15 representing a wide range of cultures and demographic diversity. The majority are white, but there are also Black, Hispanic, Asian and American Indian students. We will focus on racial and ethnic, rural and urban cultural differences as well as the needs of the Veteran and the LGBT populations.

Building on the Student Assistance Program in Pennsylvania schools, we will provide gatekeeper training and state of the art screening tools to appropriate school personnel and the behavioral health systems that serve these schools. Building on the work of past Campus Grants, we will organize a coalition of community college and university representatives to develop model suicide prevention plans and processes for higher education throughout the Commonwealth.

Project goals and measurable objectives include: a) increasing the number of persons in schools, colleges, and universities, trained to identify and refer youth at risk for suicide, b) increasing the number of clinical service providers (including those working in schools, mental health, and substance abuse) trained to assess, manage, and treat youth at risk for suicide, c) increasing awareness about youth suicide prevention, specifically including the promotion and utilization of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, d) comprehensively implementing applicable sections of the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention to reduce rates of suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide deaths in their communities, and e) promoting state systems-level change to advance suicide prevention efforts in our public schools.

With gatekeeper training and awareness campaigns, we plan to reach 186,000 youth over five years. With screening in schools, colleges, and primary care practices, we plan to reach approximately 26,000 indicated youth over five years. Thus, our total impact will be felt by nearly 212,000 youth across Pennsylvania.

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Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Program Name 
Oklahoma Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The State of Oklahoma proposes to utilize funding available from this State-Sponsored Youth Sucide Prevention and Early Intervention opportunity to continue the Oklahoma Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative.  Specfically, funds will be used to implement evidence-based youth suicide prevention strategies in selected high-need
communities and implemenation of the state’s suicide prevention plan. As a Cohort I, IV, and VI grantee of SAMSHA’s Garrett Lee Smith initiative, the State of Oklahoma has taken important steps toward the development of a public health infrastructure to promote the prevention of suicide. Universal and targeted projects have been initiated in communities, universities, schools, tribal governments, hospitals, faith communities, armed forces, mental health and substance abuse treatment facilities, and other youth-serving agencies.

Project goals are to:
1. Increase suicide prevention capacity and implementation within priority counties.
2. Increase suicide prevention capacity and implementation at the state level.
3. Increase the number of youth at risk of suicide who are identified and receive mental health services.
4. Increase the number of effective and evidence-based clinical suicide prevention practices implemented.
5. Improve and expand suicide surveillance systems.

The proposed service area is the state of Oklahoma and six high-risk communities. Contracted subrecipients will provide gatekeeper training, and establish an emergency department sucide attempt database with follow up consent protocol. The project will reach nearly 50,000 individuals with suicide prevention training/education (including 900 clinicians and up to 25 colleges/universities). Approximately 40 communities statewide will receive suicide postvention/prevention consultation and training. Funding will also be utilized to continue statewide suicide prevention efforts initiated with Cohort I, IV, and VI strategies. The state will develop four Regional Suicide Prevention Chapters of the State Suicide Prevention Council, gatekeeper and clincial suicide prevention training statewide, and crisis response protocol in public school systems to specifically address student death by suicide. The project is expected to reduce the rate of non-fatal suicide attempts and deaths in youth aged 10-24.

Community Health Network

Program Name 
Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

Community Health Network’s Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth will prevent suicide attempts and deaths of Indiana youth ages 10-24. Healthcare and youth serving organizations will be trained to identify and refer at-risk youth. Crisis, telepsychiatry and intensive care coordination services will support over 600 primary care physicians, 11 emergency departments and 13 hospitals. Over 5,000 youth per year will receive evidence-based assessments and treatments.

The Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction designated Community Health Network as the lead entity because it has the most comprehensive youth services in the state and it was already working to become the 1st large health system in the country to fully implement the Zero Suicides model. The Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth project will leverage the best practice toolkit developed by the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. Youth, families, survivors, youth serving organizations, policy makers, emergency departments, medical-surgical units, primary care, general medical providers, behavioral health entities and crisis services will:

 

  • Promote systems-level change among youth-serving agencies and health care providers
  • Improve the preparedness of youth-serving organizations (schools, foster care systems and juvenile justice programs) to identify risk and provide timely intervention and referrals
  • Improve the preparedness of clinical service providers (primary and behavioral) to assess, manage, and treat youth at risk for suicide and provide timely intervention and referrals, while adopting an institution-wide cultural adoption of the Zero Suicides in Healthcare model
  • Improve access to timely care for youth in suicidal crisis
  • Strengthen care coordination and continuity of care for youth at risk of suicide
  • Evaluate the impact of the project, disseminate lessons learned, and replicate the model

Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth is aligned with the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. Suicide prevention resources will be provided to increase the number of persons in youth-serving organizations throughout the state trained to identify/refer youth at risk for suicide and to advertise the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. It will increase the number of clinical service providers trained to assess, manage, and treat youth at risk for suicide. Continuity of care
and follow-up of youth identified at risk for suicide discharged from emergency departments and inpatient psychiatric units will be improved. Outreach will engage youth at higher risk such as individuals who are homeless, ethnic minorities, in foster care, in the juvenile justice system and LGBTQ. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-34 year olds and the third among 10-14 year olds. The CDC’s 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey revealed that the percentage of Indiana students actually attempting suicide was the 2nd highest among the 43 states surveyed, demonstrating the critical need for Zero Suicides for Indiana Youth.

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities

Program Name 
Tennessee Lives Count - Connect
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (TDMHSAS) proposes Tennessee Lives Count-Connect (Connect) to reduce suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and deaths among youth and young adults ages 10-24 by developing and implementing statewide suicide prevention and early intervention strategies, risk screening/assessment, and enhanced follow-up for 6,250 unduplicated (Year 1: 1,000; Years 2-5: 1,250/year).

The focus area is the State of Tennessee, comprising urban and rural populations with multiple socioeconomic disparities (e.g., high poverty, unemployment) that contribute to high risk for suicidal ideation/behaviors among youth/young adults. Tennessee’s suicide rate for the focus population (8.83) exceeds the national rate (7.57) and 111 young Tennesseans died by suicide in 2010. Among the focus population, 20% experience serious psychological distress; 8% of adolescents ages 12-17 and 11% of 18-25 year olds have had a major depressive episode; and 7% of adolescents, 4% of 18-20 year olds, and 16% of 21-25 year olds have been admitted for substance abuse treatment – all risk factors closely associated with youth suicide. Risk factors are exacerbated among subpopulations (children in state custody, juvenile justice involvement, veterans, and LGBTQ2S youth), with 50% having mental health and/or substance use disorders. Locally, suicide prevention, intervention, and follow-up resources are sparse and disjointed, and accessibility creates key service gaps for youth/young adults and their families.

TDMHSAS will partner with Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network and Centerstone of Tennessee to provide suicide prevention and postvention trainings for gatekeepers (schools, law enforcement, foster care, etc.) and training for primary/behavioral health professionals, screening/assessment, early intervention, follow-up, outreach/education, and linkages to treatment services, using the evidence-based Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) and Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) models. Connect will also strengthen public/private collaborations and support higher learning institutions to train students in recognizing early signs of suicide and referring individuals needing help. Outcomes will include reduction in suicidal ideation and suicide attempts by 30% and suicide deaths by 10%. A Youth Advisory Council comprising stakeholders and focus population members will support Connect’s goals/objectives: (1) increasing the number of people in youth-serving organizations trained to identify/refer youth at risk of suicide, (2) increasing the number of clinical services providers/first responders trained to assess, manage, and treat risk for suicide, (3) improving continuity of care and follow-up for youth discharged from emergency/ psychiatric units, (4) increasing risk identification, referral, and behavioral health services utilization, and (5) increasing the promotion and utilization of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Evaluation will report as required on participant outcomes and on progress and performance regarding infrastructure development.

Suicide among college and university students in the United States

This information sheet summarizes the data available on suicidal thoughts, attempts, and deaths, and describes risk and protective factors that are common among college and university students. Since there are no national databases or registries, and no single study compiling and analyzing suicide deaths, attempts, and/or thoughts among college and university students, the data presented here are from sources that have been selected as the most comprehensive and up to date.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Suicide prevention resources for adult corrections

This sheet lists written materials, trainings, organizations, and websites that contain information on suicide prevention in adult correctional facilities. It can be used with the Suicide Prevention Resource Center's information sheet The Role of Adult Correctional Officers in Preventing Suicide or on its own by correctional officers, administrators, and health/mental health care providers in adult correctional facilities, as well as by suicide prevention professionals interested in working with adult correctional facilities.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

The role of adult correctional officers in preventing suicide (SPRC Customized Information Series)

This brief sheet provides basic information to help correctional officers in facilities for adults to recognize and respond to people who may be suicidal or at high risk. (An unformatted version of the sheet that includes references is available.) An accompanying list of resources is also available.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Help a friend in need

Help A Friend In Need is a community guide for Facebook users to help college students and young adults identify potential warning signs that a friend might be in emotional distress and in need of help. The guide provides recommendations about how to recognize content on Facebook that may signal emotional distress, as well as advice on how to talk to a friend who may be struggling and how to connect them to help.

Creator 
The Jed Foundation, Facebook, the Clinton Foundation
Publisher 
The Jed Foundation
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Work and suicide prevention position statement

This position statement seeks to address the significant gaps exist in the understanding of the relationship between work and suicide, which can limit prevention efforts. The statement was released on February 20, 2014 at the Construction Industry inaugural Mental Health Conference in Brisbane. Suicide Prevention Australia (SPA) calls on organizations of all sizes to implement workplace policies and programs that promote a mentally healthy workforce and prevent suicide behaviors. The position statement also provides recommendations for employers to take action to prevent suicide.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Australia
Publisher 
Suicide Prevention Australia
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

A Manager’s Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace: 10 Action Steps for Dealing with the Aftermath of Suicide

Setting 
Workplaces
Type of Program 
Guidelines & Protocols
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
1.4, 2.1, 10.1, 10.2, 10.4
Description 

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace provides clear steps for postvention, giving leadership a sense of how to: provide an immediate response to the traumatic event; follow a short-term recovery plan; and develop long-term strategies for helping employees cope. The publication provides succinct procedures with checklists and flow charts and serves as a go-to guide for people dealing with the crisis of suicide. The goal of the guide is to help reduce the impact of the suicide event by offering a blueprint for handling these challenging situations. In addition to providing immediate access to clear steps to take for moving forward in the wake of a traumatic event, the guide helps workplaces plan to move from a solely reactive position to a proactive approach, including policy development and employee training. It is available online without charge from the Carson J Spencer Foundation.

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace provides clear steps for postvention, giving leadership a sense of how to: provide an immediate response to the traumatic event; follow a short-term recovery plan; and develop long-term strategies for helping employees cope. The publication provides succinct procedures with checklists and flow charts and serves as a go-to guide for people dealing with the crisis of suicide. The goal of the guide is to help reduce the impact of the suicide event by offering a blueprint for handling these challenging situations.

Program Description 

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplace provides clear steps for postvention, giving leadership a sense of how to: provide an immediate response to the traumatic event; follow a short-term recovery plan; and develop long-term strategies for helping employees cope. The publication provides succinct procedures with checklists and flow charts and serves as a go-to guide for people dealing with the crisis of suicide. The goal of the guide is to help reduce the impact of the suicide event by offering a blueprint for handling these challenging situations. In addition to providing immediate access to clear steps to take for moving forward in the wake of a traumatic event, the guide helps workplaces plan to move from a solely reactive position to a proactive approach, including policy development and employee training.

The guide was created through the collaboration of numerous experts and organizations, including the American Association of Suicidology, the Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention, and the Carson J Spencer Foundation. Collaborators worked to create a set of guidelines that are useful across varied types of workplaces, and they expect a range of individuals within these organizations and companies to find the information immediately helpful. This guide can be useful to managers at all levels–from the CEO of a large business to a front-line supervisor at a small organization.

Objectives 

Managers who use the guide and follow the checklists will have greater ability to:
1. Reduce suicide risk amongst employees after a suicide death.
2. Promote healthy grieving and to link those in need to resources.
3. Transition from suicide postvention to suicide prevention.

Implementation Essentials 

Managers who use the guide should be familiar with resources and services for employees who may need help.

Contact Information 
Sally Spencer-Thomas
CEO & Co-Founder
Carson J Spencer Foundation
1385 South Colorado Boulevard, Suite A-316
Denver, CO 80222
Phone: 303-219-5045
Organization 
Carson J Spencer Foundation
Costs 

A Manager's Guide to Suicide Postvention in the Workplaceis available online at no charge. 

First Posted 
Jan 17 2014
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