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After an attempt: A guide for medical providers in the emergency department taking care of suicide attempt survivors

This brochure provides tips for emergency department providers to enhance care for individuals who have attempted suicide.

Creator: 
National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) & Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2008
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Defense strategy for suicide prevention (DSSP)

The DSSP is aligned with the 2012 National Strategy (NSSP) tailored to meet the unique needs of the DoD toward the aspirational goal of zero suicide.

Creator: 
Defense Suicide Prevention Office
Publisher: 
U.S. Department of Defense (DoD)
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Student mental health and the law: A resource for institutions of higher education

This tools aids in developing awareness student mental health issues and in policies, protocols, and procedures specific to individual campuses.

Creator: 
The Jed Foundation
Publisher: 
The Jed Foundation
Date published: 
2008
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Means matter: Recommendations for colleges and universities

This page on the means matter website lists recommendations for assessing and implementing means restriction on colleges and university campuses.

Creator: 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher: 
Harvard University
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Reformulating suicide risk formulation: From prediction to prevention

Suicide risk has been typically assessed as low, medium and high despite little evidence for its validity, reliability, or utility. The authors present an alternative which uses four distinct judgments to directly inform intervention plans: (1) risk status (the patient’s risk relative to a specified subpopulation), (2) risk state (the patient’s risk compared to baseline or other specified time points), (3) available resources from which the patient can draw in crisis, and (4) foreseeable changes that may exacerbate risk. They provide a case illustration. The model is intended to provide psychiatric education with a more prevention-oriented means of assessing suicide risk.

Creator: 
Pisani, A. R., Murrie, D. C., & Silverman, M. M.
Publisher: 
Springer, Inc.
Contributor: 
University of Rochester; University of Virginia; University of Colorado-Denver; Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes
Available From: 
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40596-015-0434-6

Psychosocial interventions for mental and substance use disorders: A framework for establishing evidence-based standards

Although the current evidence base for the effects of psychosocial interventions is sizable, subsequent steps in the process of bringing a psychosocial intervention into routine clinical care are less well defined. Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders details the reasons for the gap between what is known to be effective and current practice and offers recommendations for how best to address this gap by applying a framework that can be used to establish standards for psychosocial interventions.
The framework described in Psychosocial Interventions for Mental and Substance Use Disorders can be used to chart a path toward the ultimate goal of improving the outcomes. The framework highlights the need to (1) support research to strengthen the evidence base on the efficacy and effectiveness of psychosocial interventions; (2) based on this evidence, identify the key elements that drive an intervention's effect; (3) conduct systematic reviews to inform clinical guidelines that incorporate these key elements; (4) using the findings of these systematic reviews, develop quality measures - measures of the structure, process, and outcomes of interventions; and (5) establish methods for successfully implementing and sustaining these interventions in regular practice including the training of providers of these interventions.
The recommendations offered in this report are intended to assist policy makers, health care organizations, and payers that are organizing and overseeing the provision of care for mental health and substance use disorders while navigating a new health care landscape. The recommendations also target providers, professional societies, funding agencies, consumers, and researchers, all of whom have a stake in ensuring that evidence-based, high-quality care is provided to individuals receiving mental health and substance use services.

This webpage links to a free downloadable .pdf copy or paperback for purchase.

Creator: 
England, M. J., Butler, A. S. & Gonzalez M. L. (Eds); Committee on Developing Evidence-Based Standards for Psychosocial Interventions for Mental Disorders; Board on Health Sciences Policy; Institute of Medicine
Publisher: 
National Academies Press
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Aiming for zero suicides

This report is an evaluation of a program which was set up to develop services and became more focused on supporting those people not in touch with services. In 2013, the East of England Strategic Clinical Network (SCN) set up a program to aim for ‘zero suicides’ in the region. Four Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs)were chosen to run pathfinder sites to improve outcomes for individuals and their carers, with a particular interest in partnership working, and that addressed clear gaps in services or the transition between services, and that demonstrated a commitment to engage ‘hard to reach’ patient groups and patients from ethnic minorities. The work was launched in the context of the shared vision and a ‘zero suicide’ ambition created in the launch workshop, led by Dr. Ed Coffey from Behavioral Health Services in Detroit. This was focused on each area setting ‘Wildly Important Goals’ (WIGs) and stretching targets with optimistic and ambitious expectations, and building on approaches developed in the US.

Creator: 
Moulin, L
Publisher: 
Centre for Mental Health
Contributor: 
East of England Strategic Clinical Network
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

The Carter Center journalism resource guide on behavioral health

This resource guide is intended to aid the media in fair and accurate coverage of mental illness and behavioral health issues in order that they may create a positive impact and encourage help-seeking.

Creator: 
The Carter Center
Publisher: 
The Carter Center
Contributor: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Youth warning signs

In order to achieve a consensus on warning signs for youth suicide, a panel of national and international experts reviewed and analyzed all available literature and conducted a survey of youth suicide attempt survivors, as well as those who lost a youth to suicide. They then convened to achieve a better understanding of the way youth think, feel, and behave prior to making life-threatening suicide attempts and inform others about how to effectively respond. The main goal was to determine what changes immediately preceded suicide attempts or deaths that are supported by research and rooted in clinical practice. The panel consisted of researchers with experience working with suicidal youth, public health officials, clinicians with experience helping suicidal youth, school teachers, and various other stakeholders including individuals representing national organizations focused on suicide prevention.

Creator: 
Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE); American Association for Suicidology (AAS); Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Center for the Prevention of Youth Suicide
Publisher: 
American Association for Suicidology (AAS)
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Trauma-informed care in behavioral health services: Quick guide for clinicians based on TIP 57

Based on the Treatment Improvement Protocol, Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Services (TIP 57), this quick guide equips professional care providers and administrators with information for providing care to people who have experienced trauma or are at risk of developing trauma stress reactions. It also addresses prevention, intervention, and treatment issues and strategies.

Creator: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Publisher: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes
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