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Suicide intervention and postvention training for faith leaders

These 2 trainings for faith leaders on suicide prevention, intervention and postvention are each 6 hours and can be tailored for specific audiences.

Creator: 
NAMI New Hampshire
Publisher: 
NAMI New Hampshire
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Your life matters

The Your Life Matters! campaign is an initiative of the Faith Communities Task Force of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. The campaign encourages every faith community in the United States, regardless of creed, to focus one Sabbath each year on the characteristics common to most faiths that also help prevent suicides. All the information and resources necessary to launch Your Life Matters! in your faith community are available on the website.

Creator: 
Faith Communities Task Force, National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention
Publisher: 
Education Development Center (EDC)
Contributor: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Full Text Online: 
Yes

TIP 59: Improving cultural competence

Assists professional care providers and administrators in understanding the role of culture in the delivery of substance abuse and mental health services. Discusses racial, ethnic, and cultural considerations and the core elements of cultural competence.

Creator: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Publisher: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

A survey about mental health and suicide in the United States

The Mental Health and Suicide Survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Poll on behalf of ADAA, AFSP, and NAASP between August 10-12, 2015 among 2,020 adults ages 18+. Results were weighted for age within gender, region, race/ethnicity, income, and education where necessary to align them with their actual proportions in the population. The survey shows that about 9 in 10 adults (89%) feel that mental health and physical health are equally important for their own overall health and an overwhelming majority (93%) would do something if someone close to them was thinking about suicide. Nearly four in five (78%) would encourage them to seek help from a mental health professional/doctor/primary care professional/clergy. Three in five (61%) would call a crisis hotline for them/provide them with a phone number for a crisis hotline or other resource.

Creator: 
Harris Poll
Publisher: 
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention
Contributor: 
Anxiety and Depression Association of America, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Responding to grief, trauma, and distress after a suicide: U.S. National guidelines

These guidelines provide a unified, far-reaching blueprint for the development of suicide postvention at all levels of U.S. society.

Creator: 
Survivors of Suicide Loss Task Force
Publisher: 
Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention
Date published: 
2015
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Suicide postvention as suicide prevention

This sheet contains resources from which you can learn more about how suicide postvention can be used to help prevent suicide and resources to help develop postvention messages, programs, trainings, and guidelines in a variety of settings including schools, workplaces, community organizations, support groups, and the media.

Creator: 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher: 
Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC)
Date published: 
2014
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Florida - University of South Florida

Program Name 
Florida Linking Individuals Needing Care (Florida LINC)
Grant Type: 
State
Year Awarded: 
2014
Status: 
Active
Program Description: 

The Florida Linking Individuals Needing Care (Florida LINC) Project is a partnership between the Florida Office of Suicide Prevention (SOSP), the Florida Council for Community Mental Health and the University of South Florida (USF) to innovatively enhance services to reach at-risk priority populations and ensure that young people receive needed services. The Inter-Agency Dissemination and Collaborative Network, the state suicide prevention infrastructure, will partner with up to three competitively selected applicant behavioral health regional coordinating service entities and utilize a sustainable mentorship model to continue to enhance, expand, and implement culturally sensitive, evidence-based (EBP) suicide prevention and early intervention strategies. Partnering entities will be selected based on need; prior suicide prevention experience; organizational capacity; established interagency partnerships and referral networks; community and stakeholder buy-in; and commitment to evaluation.

The goals/measurable objectives are to (a) continue to enhance the SOSP by cultivating sustainable partnerships; (b) expand the number of culturally competent trainers; (c) increase the quantity/quality of adult prevention gatekeepers; (d) utilize innovative training to increase: (i) the number of community and school personnel trained to manage crises associated with suicide, (ii) the number of youths/family members taught coping and support skills to prevent the development of suicide risk, and (iii) the quantity/quality of care coordinators able to link and track at-risk youths to cross-system, wrap around services; (e) increase distribution of prevention materials; (f) increase family involvement; (g) increase the number of at-risk youth identified by gatekeeper activities; (h) improve the quantity/quality of professional assessments of at-risk youth especially in high risk settings; and, (i) increase the number of referrals and successful, sustainable treatment, recovery, and support linkages for at-risk youth. Over 5 years, the project will prevent suicide morbidity and mortality by (1) conducting EBP training of adults [Question, Persuade, Refer, with 6,000 adults trained]; (2) training 300 mental health professionals [QPRs Suicide Risk Assessment and Management training] and 465 care coordinators [Linking Individuals Needing Care] with EBP/evidence-informed (EIP) programs; (3) providing skills training to 220 students [Penn Resiliency Program] and 720 family members [It?s Time to Talk about It Family Training] with EBP/EIP programs; (4) disseminating suicide prevention materials [16,000 National Lifeline materials and Its Time to Talk about it Family Guides distributed]; and (5) training 450 school/community personnel with an EIP program [Pillars of Postvention for Suicide Events].

Prevention efforts will target specific service sectors and at-risk youth (10-24): young adults not in school, youths involved with juvenile justice and foster care, military families, survivors of suicide attempts and loss, LGBTQ youth, AI/AN and Latino youths, and substance abuse, mental health, primary care, emergency department, and inpatient psychiatric settings. Independent quality assurance and evaluation efforts will be conducted by USF.

Websites

Suicide prevention, intervention and response video series for clergy, pastors, ministers, rabbis and other faith community leaders

This series of five videos for clergy discusses Warning signs and risk factors;  How to tell if a person is considering suicide; Responding to a suicidal person; Responding to family members after a suicide; and Designing a service for a person who has died by suicide. 

Creator: 
Caring Clergy Project
Publisher: 
Interfaith Network on Mental Illness
Date published: 
2014
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Information for faith-based and community leaders

These guidelines provide practical steps faith and community leaders can take in order to promote mental health recovery, help seeking and awareness of mental health issues. 

Creator: 
Partnership Center, Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Department of Health and Human Services
Publisher: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2014
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Everyone can play a role in the conversation about mental health

This fact sheet discusses ways in which faith and community leaders in partnership, can play a significant role in increasing awareness of mental health issues and promoting help-seeking.

Creator: 
Partnership Center, Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Department of Health and Human Services
Publisher: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2014
Full Text Online: 
Yes
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