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Suicide postvention as suicide prevention

This sheet contains resources from which you can learn more about how suicide postvention can be used to help prevent suicide and resources to help develop postvention messages, programs, trainings, and guidelines in a variety of settings including schools, workplaces, community organizations, support groups, and the media.

Creator 
Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC)
Publisher 
Education Development Center, Inc. (EDC)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Florida - University of South Florida

Program Name 
Florida Linking Individuals Needing Care (Florida LINC)
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The Florida Linking Individuals Needing Care (Florida LINC) Project is a partnership between the Florida Office of Suicide Prevention (SOSP), the Florida Council for Community Mental Health and the University of South Florida (USF) to innovatively enhance services to reach at-risk priority populations and ensure that young people receive needed services. The Inter-Agency Dissemination and Collaborative Network, the state suicide prevention infrastructure, will
partner with up to three competitively selected applicant behavioral health regional coordinating service entities and utilize a sustainable mentorship model to continue to enhance, expand, and implement culturally sensitive, evidence-based (EBP) suicide prevention and early intervention strategies. Partnering entities will be selected based on need; prior suicide prevention experience; organizational capacity; established interagency partnerships and referral networks; community and stakeholder buy-in; and commitment to evaluation.

The goals/measurable objectives are to (a) continue to enhance the SOSP by cultivating sustainable partnerships; (b) expand the number of culturally competent trainers; (c) increase the quantity/quality of adult prevention gatekeepers; (d) utilize innovative training to increase: (i) the number of community and school personnel trained to manage crises associated with suicide, (ii) the number of youths/family members taught coping and support skills to prevent the development of suicide risk, and (iii) the quantity/quality of care coordinators able to link and track at-risk youths to cross-system, wrap around services; (e) increase distribution of prevention materials; (f) increase family involvement; (g) increase the number of at-risk youth identified by gatekeeper activities; (h) improve the quantity/quality of professional assessments of at-risk youth especially in high risk settings; and, (i) increase the number of referrals and successful, sustainable treatment, recovery, and support linkages for at-risk youth. Over 5 years, the project will prevent suicide morbidity and mortality by (1) conducting EBP training of adults [Question, Persuade, Refer, with 6,000 adults trained]; (2) training 300 mental health professionals [QPR’s Suicide Risk Assessment and Management training] and 465 care coordinators [Linking Individuals Needing Care] with EBP/evidence-informed (EIP) programs; (3) providing skills training to 220 students [Penn Resiliency Program] and 720 family members [It’s Time to Talk about It Family Training] with EBP/EIP programs; (4) disseminating suicide prevention materials [16,000 National Lifeline materials and It’s Time to Talk about it Family Guides distributed]; and (5) training 450 school/community personnel with an EIP program [Pillars of Postvention for Suicide Events].

Prevention efforts will target specific service sectors and at-risk youth (10-24): young adults not in school, youths involved with juvenile justice and foster care, military families, survivors of suicide attempts and loss, LGBTQ youth, AI/AN and Latino youths, and substance abuse, mental health, primary care, emergency department, and inpatient psychiatric settings. Independent quality assurance and evaluation efforts will be conducted by USF.

Websites

Suicide prevention, intervention and response video series for clergy, pastors, ministers, rabbis and other faith community leaders

This series of five videos for clergy discusses Warning signs and risk factors;  How to tell if a person is considering suicide; Responding to a suicidal person; Responding to family members after a suicide; and Designing a service for a person who has died by suicide. 

Creator 
Caring Clergy Project
Publisher 
Interfaith Network on Mental Illness
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Information for faith-based and community leaders

These guidelines provide practical steps faith and community leaders can take in order to promote mental health recovery, help seeking and awareness of mental health issues. 

Creator 
Partnership Center, Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Department of Health and Human Services
Publisher 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Everyone can play a role in the conversation about mental health

This fact sheet discusses ways in which faith and community leaders in partnership, can play a significant role in increasing awareness of mental health issues and promoting help-seeking.

Creator 
Partnership Center, Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Department of Health and Human Services
Publisher 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published 
2014
Full Text Online 
Yes

Webinar series on faith-based approaches to preventing suicide and promoting mental health.

The first webinar in this two webinar series is Overcoming the Tragic: A Positive Pastoral/Rabbinic Approach to Mental Health which discusses a pastoral/rabbinic approach to supporting parishioners and clients struggling with depression and suicidal thoughts. This approach employs Biblical narratives to promote a capacity to activate and mobilize resiliency. It is designed for faith leaders, pastoral counselors and mental health clinicians.  The second, The Role of Faith Leaders in Suicide Prevention provides information that faith leaders need to know about suicide prevention (myths, warning signs, how to help, etc.). It will also offer ways faith leaders can help educate their communities about mental health issues and provide support for persons whose loved ones have died by suicide. In addition, it will help them understand and strengthen the resources they have in their own faith tradition that promote mental and spiritual health and/or can help in suicide prevention.

Overcoming the Tragic is available in its entirety but due to technical difficulties only the slide and handouts are available for The Role of Faith Leaders.

Creator 
Kaplan K, Arnold T, Certain RG.
Publisher 
National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention
Contributor 
HHS Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes

One voice, one community: building strong and effective partnerships among community and faith organizations

This guide offers communities strategies for developing partnerships with faith-based organizations to address the service needs of people with mental illness and substance use disorders. It highlights examples and presents challenges and benefits of such partnerships.

Creator 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Publisher 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
No
Available From 

When helping hurts: Self-care strategies for refugee community leaders & service

This webinar focuses on individual and collective reactions to trauma, resilience, compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, strategies to promote a collaborative and positive work environment, and self-care. It was designed in response to suicides in the Bhutanese-Nepali refugee community and was geared toward refugee community leaders, caseworkers, community-based organization leaders, and faith-based leaders as well as refugees.
 

Creator 
Kelly NE, Booth CL.
Publisher 
Office of Refugee Resettlement, Administration on Children and Families
Contributor 
Center for Mental Health Service (CMHS), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes

Pathways to Promise: Ministry and mental illness

Pathways to Promise is an interfaith resource center that promotes a caring ministry for people with mental illness
and their families. It offers liturgical and educational materials, program models, and networking information on
mental health issues in general and provides guidance for crisis intervention, including suicide prevention. The
website is intended for faith community leaders, interested laypeople, people with mental illness and their families
and friends, and mental health professionals interested in working with faith communities.

Creator 
Pathways to Promise
Publisher 
Pathways to Promise
Full Text Online 
Yes

Fierce goodbye: A faith-based perspective on suicide

Fierce Goodbye provides information for pastors, counselors, and suicide survivors and their friends and family.
The site includes brief interviews with theologians, stories from survivors, information on how faith communities can
become involved in suicide prevention and supporting survivors, and links to resources. Fierce Goodbye has also
produced a DVD, study guide, and book on these issues, which are available at a cost through the website.

Creator 
Mennonite Media
Publisher 
Mennonite Media
Contributor 
Faith & Values Media
Date published 
2004
Full Text Online 
Yes
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