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Pennsylvania Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Program Name 
Suicide Prevention in Schools and Colleges
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The Suicide Prevention in Schools and Colleges initiative will implement suicide prevention and early intervention strategies for youth ages 10-25 across Pennsylvania. The grant will provide gatekeeper training, suicide risk management training, standardized screening, and training in empirically supported treatments. The project will raise awareness, increase identification of at risk youth, facilitate referrals to treatment, and improve treatment outcomes.

The problem addressed by our proposal is that suicide risk is being under identified in Pennsylvania’s schools, community colleges, and universities. There is no systematic training for professionals or standardized screening procedures to identify youth at risk. Therefore, too many young people are not identified and too many of those who are high risk are not being adequately screened, and not receiving treatment and support.

There are 500 school districts and 181 community colleges and universities in Pennsylvania. In the general state population, there are 2,570,000 individuals age 10-15 representing a wide range of cultures and demographic diversity. The majority are white, but there are also Black, Hispanic, Asian and American Indian students. We will focus on racial and ethnic, rural and urban cultural differences as well as the needs of the Veteran and the LGBT populations.

Building on the Student Assistance Program in Pennsylvania schools, we will provide gatekeeper training and state of the art screening tools to appropriate school personnel and the behavioral health systems that serve these schools. Building on the work of past Campus Grants, we will organize a coalition of community college and university representatives to develop model suicide prevention plans and processes for higher education throughout the Commonwealth.

Project goals and measurable objectives include: a) increasing the number of persons in schools, colleges, and universities, trained to identify and refer youth at risk for suicide, b) increasing the number of clinical service providers (including those working in schools, mental health, and substance abuse) trained to assess, manage, and treat youth at risk for suicide, c) increasing awareness about youth suicide prevention, specifically including the promotion and utilization of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, d) comprehensively implementing applicable sections of the 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention to reduce rates of suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and suicide deaths in their communities, and e) promoting state systems-level change to advance suicide prevention efforts in our public schools.

With gatekeeper training and awareness campaigns, we plan to reach 186,000 youth over five years. With screening in schools, colleges, and primary care practices, we plan to reach approximately 26,000 indicated youth over five years. Thus, our total impact will be felt by nearly 212,000 youth across Pennsylvania.

Websites

Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Program Name 
Oklahoma Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The State of Oklahoma proposes to utilize funding available from this State-Sponsored Youth Sucide Prevention and Early Intervention opportunity to continue the Oklahoma Youth Suicide Prevention and Early Intervention Initiative.  Specfically, funds will be used to implement evidence-based youth suicide prevention strategies in selected high-need
communities and implemenation of the state’s suicide prevention plan. As a Cohort I, IV, and VI grantee of SAMSHA’s Garrett Lee Smith initiative, the State of Oklahoma has taken important steps toward the development of a public health infrastructure to promote the prevention of suicide. Universal and targeted projects have been initiated in communities, universities, schools, tribal governments, hospitals, faith communities, armed forces, mental health and substance abuse treatment facilities, and other youth-serving agencies.

Project goals are to:
1. Increase suicide prevention capacity and implementation within priority counties.
2. Increase suicide prevention capacity and implementation at the state level.
3. Increase the number of youth at risk of suicide who are identified and receive mental health services.
4. Increase the number of effective and evidence-based clinical suicide prevention practices implemented.
5. Improve and expand suicide surveillance systems.

The proposed service area is the state of Oklahoma and six high-risk communities. Contracted subrecipients will provide gatekeeper training, and establish an emergency department sucide attempt database with follow up consent protocol. The project will reach nearly 50,000 individuals with suicide prevention training/education (including 900 clinicians and up to 25 colleges/universities). Approximately 40 communities statewide will receive suicide postvention/prevention consultation and training. Funding will also be utilized to continue statewide suicide prevention efforts initiated with Cohort I, IV, and VI strategies. The state will develop four Regional Suicide Prevention Chapters of the State Suicide Prevention Council, gatekeeper and clincial suicide prevention training statewide, and crisis response protocol in public school systems to specifically address student death by suicide. The project is expected to reduce the rate of non-fatal suicide attempts and deaths in youth aged 10-24.

Florida - University of South Florida

Program Name 
Florida Linking Individuals Needing Care (Florida LINC)
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The Florida Linking Individuals Needing Care (Florida LINC) Project is a partnership between the Florida Office of Suicide Prevention (SOSP), the Florida Council for Community Mental Health and the University of South Florida (USF) to innovatively enhance services to reach at-risk priority populations and ensure that young people receive needed services. The Inter-Agency Dissemination and Collaborative Network, the state suicide prevention infrastructure, will
partner with up to three competitively selected applicant behavioral health regional coordinating service entities and utilize a sustainable mentorship model to continue to enhance, expand, and implement culturally sensitive, evidence-based (EBP) suicide prevention and early intervention strategies. Partnering entities will be selected based on need; prior suicide prevention experience; organizational capacity; established interagency partnerships and referral networks; community and stakeholder buy-in; and commitment to evaluation.

The goals/measurable objectives are to (a) continue to enhance the SOSP by cultivating sustainable partnerships; (b) expand the number of culturally competent trainers; (c) increase the quantity/quality of adult prevention gatekeepers; (d) utilize innovative training to increase: (i) the number of community and school personnel trained to manage crises associated with suicide, (ii) the number of youths/family members taught coping and support skills to prevent the development of suicide risk, and (iii) the quantity/quality of care coordinators able to link and track at-risk youths to cross-system, wrap around services; (e) increase distribution of prevention materials; (f) increase family involvement; (g) increase the number of at-risk youth identified by gatekeeper activities; (h) improve the quantity/quality of professional assessments of at-risk youth especially in high risk settings; and, (i) increase the number of referrals and successful, sustainable treatment, recovery, and support linkages for at-risk youth. Over 5 years, the project will prevent suicide morbidity and mortality by (1) conducting EBP training of adults [Question, Persuade, Refer, with 6,000 adults trained]; (2) training 300 mental health professionals [QPR’s Suicide Risk Assessment and Management training] and 465 care coordinators [Linking Individuals Needing Care] with EBP/evidence-informed (EIP) programs; (3) providing skills training to 220 students [Penn Resiliency Program] and 720 family members [It’s Time to Talk about It Family Training] with EBP/EIP programs; (4) disseminating suicide prevention materials [16,000 National Lifeline materials and It’s Time to Talk about it Family Guides distributed]; and (5) training 450 school/community personnel with an EIP program [Pillars of Postvention for Suicide Events].

Prevention efforts will target specific service sectors and at-risk youth (10-24): young adults not in school, youths involved with juvenile justice and foster care, military families, survivors of suicide attempts and loss, LGBTQ youth, AI/AN and Latino youths, and substance abuse, mental health, primary care, emergency department, and inpatient psychiatric settings. Independent quality assurance and evaluation efforts will be conducted by USF.

Websites

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities

Program Name 
Tennessee Lives Count - Connect
Grant Type 
State
Year Awarded 
2014
Status 
Active
Program Description 

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (TDMHSAS) proposes Tennessee Lives Count-Connect (Connect) to reduce suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and deaths among youth and young adults ages 10-24 by developing and implementing statewide suicide prevention and early intervention strategies, risk screening/assessment, and enhanced follow-up for 6,250 unduplicated (Year 1: 1,000; Years 2-5: 1,250/year).

The focus area is the State of Tennessee, comprising urban and rural populations with multiple socioeconomic disparities (e.g., high poverty, unemployment) that contribute to high risk for suicidal ideation/behaviors among youth/young adults. Tennessee’s suicide rate for the focus population (8.83) exceeds the national rate (7.57) and 111 young Tennesseans died by suicide in 2010. Among the focus population, 20% experience serious psychological distress; 8% of adolescents ages 12-17 and 11% of 18-25 year olds have had a major depressive episode; and 7% of adolescents, 4% of 18-20 year olds, and 16% of 21-25 year olds have been admitted for substance abuse treatment – all risk factors closely associated with youth suicide. Risk factors are exacerbated among subpopulations (children in state custody, juvenile justice involvement, veterans, and LGBTQ2S youth), with 50% having mental health and/or substance use disorders. Locally, suicide prevention, intervention, and follow-up resources are sparse and disjointed, and accessibility creates key service gaps for youth/young adults and their families.

TDMHSAS will partner with Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network and Centerstone of Tennessee to provide suicide prevention and postvention trainings for gatekeepers (schools, law enforcement, foster care, etc.) and training for primary/behavioral health professionals, screening/assessment, early intervention, follow-up, outreach/education, and linkages to treatment services, using the evidence-based Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) and Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) models. Connect will also strengthen public/private collaborations and support higher learning institutions to train students in recognizing early signs of suicide and referring individuals needing help. Outcomes will include reduction in suicidal ideation and suicide attempts by 30% and suicide deaths by 10%. A Youth Advisory Council comprising stakeholders and focus population members will support Connect’s goals/objectives: (1) increasing the number of people in youth-serving organizations trained to identify/refer youth at risk of suicide, (2) increasing the number of clinical services providers/first responders trained to assess, manage, and treat risk for suicide, (3) improving continuity of care and follow-up for youth discharged from emergency/ psychiatric units, (4) increasing risk identification, referral, and behavioral health services utilization, and (5) increasing the promotion and utilization of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Evaluation will report as required on participant outcomes and on progress and performance regarding infrastructure development.

Plan, Prepare, Prevent: The SOS Signs of Suicide® Online Gatekeeper Training

Setting 
Middle Schools & High Schools
Type of Program 
Education & Training
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
2.3, 2.4 (2012)
Description 

Plan, Prepare, Prevent: The SOS Signs of Suicide® Online Gatekeeper Training is the training module of the larger SOS Signs of Suicide Prevention Program (listed in Section I of the BPR). It can also be used independently of the SOS Program. The intended audience for this course is middle and high school staff members, or staff at other organizations looking to deepen their understanding of youth suicide prevention. Plan, Prepare, Prevent is available from Screening for Mental Health for a fee.

Program Description 

Plan, Prepare, Prevent: The SOS Signs of Suicide® Online Gatekeeper Training is the training module of the larger SOS Signs of Suicide Prevention Program (listed in Section I of the BPR). It can also be used independently of the SOS Program. The intended audience for this course is middle and high school staff members, or staff at other organizations looking to deepen their understanding of youth mental health and considering implementing an evidence-based prevention program. The module provides contextual information about mental illness, suicide, and risk and protective factors, and teaches participants to recognize and respond to the warning signs of depression and suicide. The course takes approximately 90 minutes to complete, and has videos and interactive quizzes throughout the three sections. The course offers contact hours for licensure for school nurses, social workers, psychologists, and counselors. It also offers a Certificate of Completion for anyone who finishes the course.

Screening for Mental Health® (SMH) developed the SOS Program in 2001. To create the online course, SMH staff worked with the Tufts University School of Medicine’s Health Care Institute. A cross-disciplinary team piloted the module, providing feedback prior to launching the online course.

Objectives 

As a result of completing the Plan, Prepare, Prevent online course, school staff will be able to:
1. Discuss the prevalence of youth depression and suicidal behavior
2. Describe risk and protective factors for depression and suicidal behavior
3. Recognize and respond to suicide warning signs
4. Understand the steps involved in rolling out an evidence-based school suicide prevention program

Implementation Essentials 
  • The Plan, Prepare, Prevent online course is best used as part of a collaborative approach to school-based suicide prevention. 
Contact Information 
Rebecca Davis
Youth Programs Manager
Screening for Mental Health, Inc.
1 Washington Street, Suite 304
Wellesley Hills, MA 02481
Voice: 781-591-5242
Fax: 781-431-7447
 
Organization 
Screening for Mental Health, Inc.
Costs 

The Plan, Prepare, Prevent online training is included in the SOS Program (listed in Section I of the BPR) at no additional charge. Organizations not currently using the SOS Program may gain free access to the online training by visiting www.mentalhealthscreening.org/Gatekeeper. The course offers free contact hour credits for completion.

First Posted 
Mar 10 2014

Networks for Life: An Educator's Role in Youth Suicide Prevention

Setting 
Middle Schools & High Schools
Type of Program 
Education & Training
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
1.1, 2.4, 3.1, 5.2, 7.1 (2012)
Description 

Networks for Life: An Educator’s Role in Youth Suicide Prevention is a 3-hour training on suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention in the school setting. Designed for use in Washington State, it covers (1) the scope of youth suicide locally; (2) risk and protective factors; (3) school policies, procedures, and crisis response plans; (4) strategies for creating a preventive culture; (5) signs of depression and suicidal thinking in adolescents; (6) a basic 3-step intervention process; (7) local resources; and (8) best practices in postvention and the prevention of suicide contagion. Program costs vary. Contact Karyn Brownson of the Washington Youth Suicide Prevention Program for more information.

Program Description 

Networks for Life: An Educator’s Role in Youth Suicide Prevention is a 3-hour training on suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention in the school setting. Designed for use in Washington State, it covers (1) the scope of youth suicide locally; (2) risk and protective factors; (3) school policies, procedures, and crisis response plans; (4) strategies for creating a preventive culture; (5) signs of depression and suicidal thinking in adolescents; (6) a basic 3-step intervention process; (7) local resources; and (8) best practices in postvention and the prevention of suicide contagion. The training emphasizes schools’ important and unique role in youth suicide prevention and gives participants specific, easy-to-use tools. Discussions, brainstorms, practice scenarios, and opportunities to review policies and resources are included.

Networks for Lifeevolved from many years of work in the field by Washington's Youth Suicide Prevention Program staff, including teachers, social workers, and other experts in adolescent development. The educator’s version of this training was created in response to requests for more integration of one-on-one intervention skills with local resource networks and school policies. During the 2012-13 school year, this training was implemented and tested through a series of workshops across the state of Washington and edited based on input from educators representing 83 school districts. Information was drawn from credible sources including the Washington State Department of Health, SAMHSA, and the SPRC/AFSP Best Practices Registry for Suicide Prevention.

Objectives 

Educators who participate in Networks for Life training will have increased:
1. Capacity to identify and appropriately respond to signs of adolescent stress, depression, and suicidal thinking;
2. Understanding of how risk factors, stress, and depression are and are not related to suicide; and,
3. Understanding of their role in youth suicide prevention.

Implementation Essentials 
  • Schools that implement Networks for Life should have protocols in place to guide response to students who may be at risk of suicide.
Contact Information 
Karyn Brownson
Director of Training
Youth Suicide Prevention Program
444 NE Ravenna Blvd., Ste. 103
Seattle, WA 98144
206-297-5922 x116
Website: www.yspp.org
Organization 
Washington Youth Suicide Prevention Program
Costs 

Program costs vary. Contact Karyn Brownson for more information.

First Posted 
Mar 3 2014

Umatter for Schools Youth Suicide Prevention

Setting 
Middle & High Schools
Type of Program 
Awareness/Outreach
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
1.1, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 6.5
Description 

Umatter for Schools Youth Suicide Prevention is a two-day training program that provides school teams with the knowledge and skills to develop comprehensive, asset-based approaches to suicide prevention in their schools. Teams may include teachers, administrators, counselors, and other staff, and are encouraged to bring a representative from a local mental health agency in their area. Umatter is available from Center for Health and Learning.

Program Description 

Umatter for Schools Youth Suicide Prevention is a two-day training program that provides school teams with the knowledge and skills to develop comprehensive, asset-based approaches to suicide prevention in their schools. Teams may include teachers, administrators, counselors, and other staff, and are encouraged to bring a representative from a local mental health agency in their area. The program includes gatekeeper training with an emphasis on building assets and protective factors for all youth, developing school protocols, learning to use a student curriculum, and making an action plan to implement suicide prevention strategies in the school community. Umatter also includes a public information campaign with the central message that adults matter because they can act as gatekeepers for youth who are suicidal. The campaign emphasizes that young people who are depressed or suicidal also matter because they are needed by their families, friends, and communities whether they feel that in the moment or not.

Umatter was developed following a review of several school-based suicide prevention programs to determine key concepts. Additional concepts were drawn from the American Association of Suicidology and the academic literature about suicide. The learning activities in Umatter are designed to reach the learning preferences and styles of all participants, and to ensure maximum transfer of knowledge, skills, and attitudes to the workplace.

Objectives 

School personnel who complete the Umatter training will be able to:
1. Identify cultural factors that contribute to the stigma associated with seeking help.
2. Identify warning signs, risk factors, and protective factors for youth in distress.
3. Describe their roles and responsibilities in responding to suicidal behavior.
4. Establish school protocols for suicide prevention, crisis intervention, and suicide postvention.
5. Describe the Lifelines student curriculum and supports for the curriculum.
6. Identify possible challenges to the implementation of the Lifelines curriculum.
7. Develop a school-wide strategy to build critical connections among schools, parents, and regional support services.

Implementation Essentials 
  • Umatter includes the use of the Lifelines suicide prevention curriculum that is found in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices and in the Best Practices Registry for suicide prevention.
Contact Information 
Gwen Mousin, Operations Manager
Center for Health and Learning
28 Vernon Street, Suite 319
Brattleboro, VT 05301
Voice: 802-254-6590
Fax: 802-254-5816
Organization 
Center for Health and Learning
Costs 

Cost of two-day (6 hours per day) Umatter training is $5,000 plus travel and lodging for two trainers. Additional consultation is available at a rate of $100/hour. Individual arrangements may be possible. The Umatter Facilitator’s Guide costs $100. The participant materials, Umatter Handbook, and Umatter CD-ROM cost $75/person. Umatter public information materials including posters, brochures, and wallet cards may be purchased and customized for your audience. The Lifelines curriculum is $225 and is available from Hazelden (www.hazelden.org). A Training of Trainers in Umatter for Schools is in development. 

First Posted 
Jan 31 2014

Suicide Prevention: Supporting our Youth

Setting 
High Schools and Middle Schools
Type of Program 
Education & Training
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
13.2 (2012)
Description 

Suicide Prevention: Supporting Our Youth is a one- to three-hour training developed by Samaritans for middle school and high school faculty and staff. Participants learn important information about suicide prevention, and are introduced to the concept and skills of befriending. Materials include a PowerPoint presentation, handouts, and wallet cards. Role-playing and practice modules are included for extended (2-3 hour) versions of the training. Suicide Prevention: Supporting Our Youth is available at no charge in most parts of the state of Massachusetts.

Program Description 
Suicide Prevention: Supporting Our Youth is a one- to three-hour training developed by Samaritans for middle school and high school faculty and staff. Participants learn important information about suicide prevention, and are introduced to the concept and skills of befriending. Materials include a PowerPoint presentation, handouts, and wallet cards. Role-playing and practice modules are included for extended (2-3 hour) versions of the training.
 
Suicide Prevention: Supporting Our Youth was developed by Kelley Cunningham, Manager for Community Education and Outreach at Samaritans, who is certified by the American Association of Suicidology as a School Suicide Prevention Specialist.  She is also a registered ASIST Trainer (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training).  Sources for the information given in the workshop include the American Association of Suicidology, Suicide Prevention Resource Center, and the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. 
Objectives 

Educators who take the Suicide Prevention: Supporting Our Youth workshop will acquire greater:
1. Knowledge of warning signs and risk factors for suicide.
2. Knowledge of protective factors against suicide.
3. Understanding of how to obtain help for students at risk.
4. Understanding of how to communicate effectively with at-risk students.

Implementation Essentials 
  • Schools that use Suicide Prevention: Supporting Our Youth should have established protocols for managing and getting help for students who may be at risk. 
Contact Information 
Kelley Cunningham
Manager, Community Education & Outreach
Samaritans
41 West St., 4th Floor
Boston, MA 02111
617-536-2460
617-247-0207
 
Organization 
Samaritans
Costs 

Suicide Prevention: Supporting Our Youth is available at no charge in most parts of the state of Massachusetts. Contact Kelley Cunningham for more information.

First Posted 
Jan 31 2014

Creating Suicide Safety in Schools

Setting 
Middle Schools & High Schools
Type of Program 
Education & Training
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
1.1, 1.2, 2.4, 5.2, 7.1
Description 

Creating Suicide Safety in Schools (CSSS) is a one-day workshop designed for school-based interdisciplinary teams, empowering them to establish realistic short-term plans for effective suicide prevention and response planning. Participants spend time planning and problem solving for specific actions needed for suicide-safer schools. The workshop's format includes didactic presentations coupled with small workgroup discussions, checklists, group planning documents, and exposure to free and low-cost resources that meet best practice recommendations. The Creating Suicide Safety in Schools workshop is available from the Suicide Prevention Center of New York State (SPCNY). Contact SPCNY for workshop information and costs.

Program Description 

Creating Suicide Safety in Schools (CSSS) is a one-day workshop designed for school-based interdisciplinary teams, empowering them to establish realistic short-term plans for effective suicide prevention and response planning. Participants spend time planning and problem solving for specific actions needed for suicide-safer schools. The workshop's format includes didactic presentations coupled with small workgroup discussions, checklists, group planning documents, and exposure to free and low-cost resources that meet best practice recommendations and/or evidence-based practice standards. Creating Suicide Safety in Schools incorporates key aspects of the Social-Ecological Prevention Model, public health perspectives, and recommendations for school-based suicide prevention practices (e.g.. Berman, Jobes, & Silverman, 2006; Miller, 2011). Further, the workshop explores six broad categories of school-based suicide safety: (1) policies, procedures, and standardized protocols; (2) staff training; (3) promotion of student protective factors; (4) identification and reduction of student risk factors: (5) postvention planning; and (6) engagement of family and community.

To accompany the workshop, the Suicide Prevention Center of New York developed a resource binder that included public domain materials using two criteria: (1) well-researched and well-aligned with principles of the Best Practices Registry; (2) usable by school personnel for suicide prevention planning. Original material was added to introduce and organize existing materials and to fill in missing information. Evaluations of early workshops guided the refinement of materials in the binder and led to added planning worksheets, checklists, and structured activities.

Objectives 

School personnel that attend the Creating Suicide Safety in Schools workshop will be able to:
1. Review, refine, and implement school-based suicide prevention, intervention and postvention activities.
2. Create a school-specific comprehensive suicide prevention and response plan.
3. Assess suicide program and training needs.
4. Access available local and national resources for school-based suicide prevention.

Implementation Essentials 

Before the implementation of school-based suicide prevention programs, protocols for response to students who may be at risk of suicide should be developed and disseminated.

Contact Information 
Pat Breux, R. N.
Youth Suicide Prevention Specialist
Suicide Prevention Center of New York
150 Broadway, Suite 301
Menands, NY 12204
518-402-1156 (voice)
518-474-6995 (fax)
 
Organization 
Suicide Prevention Center of New York State (SPCNY)
Costs 

The Creating Suicide Safety in Schools workshop is available from the Suicide Prevention Center of New York State (SPCNY). Contact SPCNY for workshop information and costs.

First Posted 
Nov 21 2013

Journey to Wellness

Setting 
Middle Schools, High Schools, Communities
Type of Program 
Education & Training
2001 NSSP Goals Addressed 
2.4, 5.2 (2012)
Description 

Journey to Wellness (J2W) is an eight-week wellness program for American Indian youth 12-18 years of age. Participants receive a sequenced set of eight one-hour sessions that are framed positively toward healthy living styles while at the same time exploring risk factors, suicide prevention, and other suicide-related issues. The Journey to Wellness program manual is available from the Battle River Treaty 6 Health Centre without charge.

Program Description 

Journey to Wellness (J2W) is an eight-week wellness program for American Indian youth 12-18 years of age. Participants receive a sequenced set of eight one-hour sessions that are framed positively toward healthy living styles while at the same time exploring risk factors, suicide prevention, and other suicide-related issues. The sessions are activity-oriented and designed to engage youth. Sessions topics include: relationship building, problem solving, self-esteem building, facts and myths of suicide, networking, life planning, emergency planning, and finally, a celebratory event to close out the sessions.J2W is delivered along gender and age group divisions to promote comfort and safety.

J2Wwas developed by BTC Indian Health Servicesstaff. An initial literature review of best practices was conducted. Input was sought from youth in the communities.  The initial program was piloted to female students in two communities. After pilot, focus groups were conducted with the participants. In addition, focus groups were held with male students to review the program and the potential effectiveness with this population. 

Objectives 

Students who complete the Journey to Wellness program will have:
1. Closer relationships to peers and adults in their schools.
2. Greater problem-solving skills.
3. Greater understanding of how to seek help for suicide.
4. Greater knowledge of helping resources.

Implementation Essentials 
  • Schools that use Journey to Wellness should have established protocols for how to respond to you youth who may be at risk for suicide.
Contact Information 
Ms. José Pruden
Wellness Director
Battle River Treaty 6 Health Centre Inc.
P.O.Box 1658
North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada S9A 3W2
Voice: 1-306-937-6700
Organization 
Battle River Treaty 6 Health Centre Inc.
Costs 

The Journey to Wellness program manual is available without charge. Contact Ms. José Pruden for a copy.

First Posted 
Nov 15 2013
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