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The relationship between bullying and suicide: What we know and what it means for schools

The purpose of this document is to provide concrete, action-oriented information based on the latest science to help improve schools’ understanding of and ability to prevent and respond to the problem of bullying and suicide-related behavior.

Creator: 
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
Publisher: 
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)
Date published: 
2014
Full Text Online: 
Yes

HIPAA privacy rule and sharing information related to mental health

This guide addresses some of the more frequently asked questions about when it is appropriate under the Privacy Rule for a health care provider to share the protected health information of a patient who is being treated for a mental health condition.
In addition, it provides relevant reminders about related issues, such as the heightened protections afforded to psychotherapy notes by the Privacy Rule, a parent’s right to access the protected health information of a minor child as the child’s personal representative, the potential applicability of Federal alcohol and drug abuse confidentiality regulations or state laws that may provide more stringent protections for the information than HIPAA, and the intersection of HIPAA and Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) in a school setting.

Creator: 
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Publisher: 
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Date published: 
2014
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Trauma-informed approaches: Federal activities and initiatives

This report documents the projects, programs, and initiatives of more than three dozen federal agencies, departments, and offices. With agencies’ commitment to implementing gender-responsive, trauma-informed approaches, it addresses the growing national interest in this issue, the work of the Federal Partners Committee, and the specific progress that participating agencies have made over the past  three years (2010-2013), since the Committee’s publication of its first report in 2011. This new report, developed with support from SAMHSA’s National Center for Trauma-Informed Care, clearly demonstrates the application of trauma-informed approaches across a wide range of settings and systems and encourages other governmental and nongovernmental agencies to implement a cross-sector, interagency, inter-systems’ realization, recognition, and response to trauma. Other works of the Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma can be found at http://nicic.gov/library/025082

Creator: 
Federal Partners Committee on Women and Trauma
Publisher: 
National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors (NASMHPD)
Date published: 
2013
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Creating Suicide Safety in Schools

Setting: 
Middle Schools & High Schools
Type of Program: 
Education & Training
2012 NSSP Objectives Addessed*: 
Description: 

Creating Suicide Safety in Schools (CSSS) is a one-day workshop designed for school-based interdisciplinary teams, empowering them to establish realistic short-term plans for effective suicide prevention and response planning. Participants spend time planning and problem solving for specific actions needed for suicide-safer schools. The workshop's format includes didactic presentations coupled with small workgroup discussions, checklists, group planning documents, and exposure to free and low-cost resources that meet best practice recommendations. The Creating Suicide Safety in Schools workshop is available from the Suicide Prevention Center of New York State (SPCNY). Contact SPCNY for workshop information and costs.

Program Description: 

Creating Suicide Safety in Schools (CSSS) is a one-day workshop designed for school-based interdisciplinary teams, empowering them to establish realistic short-term plans for effective suicide prevention and response planning. Participants spend time planning and problem solving for specific actions needed for suicide-safer schools. The workshop's format includes didactic presentations coupled with small workgroup discussions, checklists, group planning documents, and exposure to free and low-cost resources that meet best practice recommendations and/or evidence-based practice standards. Creating Suicide Safety in Schools incorporates key aspects of the Social-Ecological Prevention Model, public health perspectives, and recommendations for school-based suicide prevention practices (e.g.. Berman, Jobes, & Silverman, 2006; Miller, 2011). Further, the workshop explores six broad categories of school-based suicide safety: (1) policies, procedures, and standardized protocols; (2) staff training; (3) promotion of student protective factors; (4) identification and reduction of student risk factors: (5) postvention planning; and (6) engagement of family and community.

To accompany the workshop, the Suicide Prevention Center of New York developed a resource binder that included public domain materials using two criteria: (1) well-researched and well-aligned with principles of the Best Practices Registry; (2) usable by school personnel for suicide prevention planning. Original material was added to introduce and organize existing materials and to fill in missing information. Evaluations of early workshops guided the refinement of materials in the binder and led to added planning worksheets, checklists, and structured activities.

Objectives: 

School personnel that attend the Creating Suicide Safety in Schools workshop will be able to:
1. Review, refine, and implement school-based suicide prevention, intervention and postvention activities.
2. Create a school-specific comprehensive suicide prevention and response plan.
3. Assess suicide program and training needs.
4. Access available local and national resources for school-based suicide prevention.

Implementation Essentials: 

Before the implementation of school-based suicide prevention programs, protocols for response to students who may be at risk of suicide should be developed and disseminated.

Contact Information: 
Cassandra Kahl
Suicide Prevention Center of New York
150 Broadway, Suite 301
Menands, NY 12204
518-402-1113 (voice)
518-474-6995 (fax)
Organization: 
Suicide Prevention Center of New York State (SPCNY)
Costs: 

The Creating Suicide Safety in Schools workshop is available from the Suicide Prevention Center of New York State (SPCNY). Contact SPCNY for workshop information and costs.

First Posted: 
Nov 21 2013

Journey to Wellness

Setting: 
Middle Schools, High Schools, Communities
Type of Program: 
Education & Training
2012 NSSP Objectives Addessed*: 

7.1

Description: 

Journey to Wellness (J2W) is an eight-week wellness program for American Indian youth 12-18 years of age. Participants receive a sequenced set of eight one-hour sessions that are framed positively toward healthy living styles while at the same time exploring risk factors, suicide prevention, and other suicide-related issues. The Journey to Wellness program manual is available from the Battle River Treaty 6 Health Centre without charge.

Program Description: 

Journey to Wellness (J2W) is an eight-week wellness program for American Indian youth 12-18 years of age. Participants receive a sequenced set of eight one-hour sessions that are framed positively toward healthy living styles while at the same time exploring risk factors, suicide prevention, and other suicide-related issues. The sessions are activity-oriented and designed to engage youth. Sessions topics include: relationship building, problem solving, self-esteem building, facts and myths of suicide, networking, life planning, emergency planning, and finally, a celebratory event to close out the sessions.J2W is delivered along gender and age group divisions to promote comfort and safety.

J2Wwas developed by BTC Indian Health Servicesstaff. An initial literature review of best practices was conducted. Input was sought from youth in the communities.  The initial program was piloted to female students in two communities. After pilot, focus groups were conducted with the participants. In addition, focus groups were held with male students to review the program and the potential effectiveness with this population. 

Objectives: 

Students who complete the Journey to Wellness program will have:
1. Closer relationships to peers and adults in their schools.
2. Greater problem-solving skills.
3. Greater understanding of how to seek help for suicide.
4. Greater knowledge of helping resources.

Implementation Essentials: 
  • Schools that use Journey to Wellness should have established protocols for how to respond to you youth who may be at risk for suicide.
Contact Information: 
Ms. José Pruden
Wellness Director
Battle River Treaty 6 Health Centre Inc.
P.O.Box 1658
North Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada S9A 3W2
Voice: 1-306-937-6700
Organization: 
Battle River Treaty 6 Health Centre Inc.
Costs: 

The Journey to Wellness program manual is available without charge. Contact Ms. José Pruden for a copy.

First Posted: 
Nov 15 2013

Media guidelines for bullying prevention

These guidelines for bullying prevention were developed in partnership with a wide range of behavioral health and media experts and provide recommendations for media coverage of bullying.  The guidelines are designed to provide journalists, members of the entertainment industry, bloggers, and others with the up-to-date, accurate information needed to cover and depict bullying issues in a factual and sensitive way.

Creator: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Publisher: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2013
Full Text Online: 
Yes

Beyond Rhetoric: Does It Get Better?

Stephen Russell, University of Arizona, Member, SPRC Steering Committee
Guest Columnist

Everything changed when the attention of the media was captured by several highly visible youth suicides that seemed to be directly linked to homophobic bullying. Suddenly the public was aware of LGBT youth and bullying, as well as the implications of bullying for mental health and suicide. This has been a major cultural shift from silence (arguably denial) to dramatic public, media, and celebrity attention. The good news is that people are finally paying attention to the pervasive homophobia that has been undermining the well-being of LGBT youth for generations. The dilemma with such public attention is that it can provide simplistic frames of understanding of complex challenges.

One simplification, and a dangerous one, is the idea that bullying can cause suicide. Suicide and self-harm are complex problems. Nearly all cases in which a young person thinks about or engages in suicidal behavior are the results of the complex interactions of multiple risk factors. The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) points out that the term “bullycide” and sensational media coverage that suggests an oversimplified cause-and-effect relationship between bullying and suicide may undermine the ability of bullied youth to imagine positive resolutions.

Another simplification is that “it gets better.”  A single well-intentioned video with this message went viral and became a social media phenomenon, inspiring entertainment stars, politicians, and professional sports teams to create video messages of hope for LGBT youth.

With support from the AFSP, I investigated the question of whether it actually gets better. I found that suicide risk for LGBT youth seems to be highest during the teenage years. But it doesn’t just “get better.” Many youth have criticized this message. The youth-driven Make It Better Project presents an alternative to this view. LGBT teens don’t want to wait until adulthood, muddling through, assuming that the teenage years are simply, by definition, homophobic. The teen years are a time of heightened concerns about conformity, especially related to gender expression and sexuality. But these developmental changes are why we need strategies to promote discussion of issues related to gender and sexuality – as well as mental health, depression and suicide – in ways that are authentic and promote healthy development. Everyone wants to prevent bullying and suicide. We need less rhetoric and fewer catchy phrases, and more real conversations about the reality of teens’ lives.

Resources

Suicide and Bullying Issue Brief (SPRC)

Bullying and Suicide (American Foundation for Suicide Prevention)

Make It Better Project
 

TAP 33: Systems-level implementation of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT)

Describes core elements of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) programs for people with or at risk for substance use disorders. Describes SBIRT services implementation, covering challenges, barriers, cost, and sustainability.

Creator: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Publisher: 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published: 
2013
Full Text Online: 
Yes

A Strategic Approach to Suicide Prevention in High Schools

Monday, September 23, 2013 - 3:00pm - 4:30pm
EST

This webinar provided an overview of the research on school-based suicide prevention programs and identified resources that can be helpful in developing and implementing your own program.  In addition, it offered examples of how two states developed programs to prevent suicide in a variety of school systems, including those serving ethnically diverse students. While this webinar focused on high schools, some of the information may be applicable to any grade level.  

Objectives: In this webinar, participants working to prevent suicide learned how to:

  • Explain how a strategic approach to suicide prevention can be used in high schools
  • Identify resources for use as part of a strategic approach (e.g., BPR, NREPP, “Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools”)
  • Describe the efforts of two states to be strategic and culturally-appropriate in their approach to school-based suicide prevention.

Webinar Recording: A Strategic Approach to Suicide Prevention in High Schools
 

Additional Resources:

This video features Kentucky school principals, staff and parents who have experienced suicide loss, including suicide contagion in the school, and steps schools can take to reduce suicide and suicide attempts among their students. This video can be used with staff training, but is not appropriate for youth or children. To access a copy of the video itself, please contact Jan Ulrich (jan.ulrich@ky.gov).

 

Event Contact
Lieu Dominique
Presenter(s): 
Phil Rodgers, PhD, Evaluation Scientist, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
Chris Miara, MS, Director of Operations and Resources, Suicide Prevention Resource Center
Patricia Breux, RN, BSN, Youth Prevention Specialist, Suicide Prevention Center of New York State
Jan Ulrich, State Suicide Prevention Coordinator, Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health
Patti Clark, MBA, CPS, Project Coordinator, Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health
Moderator: 
Rosalyn Blogier, LCSW-C, SAMHSA Public Health Advisor
Presenter Biographies: 

Philip Rodgers, PhD, is an Evaluation Scientist for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. For the past nine years, he has managed the Best Practices Registry for Suicide Prevention in collaboration with the Suicide Prevention Resource Center. The Best Practices Registry provides a listing of suicide prevention programs, policies, tools, and materials, which have been reviewed and approved by experts in the field. Dr. Rodgers has given numerous presentations and workshops regarding suicide prevention and the evaluation of suicide prevention programs. He earned his undergraduate degree in experimental psychology from California State University Los Angeles and his doctorate in research and evaluation methodology from Utah State University.

Chris Miara, MS, is a Senior Project Director at the Education Development Center, Inc., with many years’ experience planning, implementing, and evaluating government-funded programs to prevent injuries, violence, and suicide. She is Director of Operations and Resources at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center. In collaboration with the National Association of Mental Health Program Directors and with funding from SAMHSA, Ms. Miara also played a key role in the development of "Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools.

Pat Breux, RN, BSN, is the Youth Prevention Specialist at the Suicide Prevention Center of New York (www.PreventSuicideNY.org), which is an agency of the New York State Office of Mental Health Suicide Prevention Initiative.  In her role at the Center, she provides training, consultation and access to research and best practices in suicide prevention, intervention and postvention to schools and youth serving organizations across the state.  Her work in Chemung County received National recognition from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration with a Science and Service Award in 2008.  She received the Advocate of the Year Award from Families Together in NYS in 2009 and the Excellence in Education Award from the Western NY Chapter of American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in 2010.  She is a certified SafeTALK, CONNECT Postvention and QPR trainer, a Master Trainer of Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) and a provider of Lifelines trilogy of trainings.  She is the lead developer of “Creating Suicide Safety in Schools Workshop” which has been endorsed by the New York Association of School Psychologists.

Jan Ulrich is the State Suicide Prevention Coordinator with the Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Jan has been involved with suicide prevention and awareness efforts on a national, state and local basis since 2002, after the issue of suicide touched her family very personally.  She was a member of the Kentucky Suicide Prevention Group (KSPG) from 2002 to 2007, and served on the KSPG board for several years prior to her employment with BH/DID in 2007.  Jan has been a certified QPR Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Trainer since 2004 and a QPR Master Trainer (T4T).  She is a recipient of NAMI KY Prevention Partner Award, and Mental Health America of KY Advocacy Award for her work in suicide prevention.  Jan is also the founder of the Suicide Prevention Consortium of Kentucky (SPCK – Live Long).

Patti Clark, MBA, CPS, is currently the project coordinator for Kentucky’s Garrett Lee Smith Suicide Prevention Grant, under the Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health.  The Suicide Prevention Efforts for Adolescents in Kentucky focuses on suicide prevention efforts for youth and the families in the state with emphasis on school-based implementation, LGBTQ suicide prevention and resilience development, and suicide prevention for military personnel and their families. She is a certified prevention specialist.

Prior to working in suicide prevention, she was a project coordinator for Kentucky’s Underage Drinking Strategic Prevention Framework project in Owen County, Kentucky where binge drinking among high school youth was reduced by 36% over a two-year period. She is a SPF master trainer and co-wrote the evaluation portion of Kentucky’s SPF manual. She also teaches the needs assessment portion (Step 1) of Prevention Academy for the state.

Prior to her work in prevention, Patti was a newspaper publisher and community advocate, organizing a variety of events and activities and bringing together community members to address issues. 

She is a graduate of Eastern Kentucky University (BA Journalism) and Sullivan University (MBA). She is currently working on her Master of Divinity degree at Luther Rice University in Atlanta.

Rosalyn (Roz) Blogier, LCSW-C, is a licensed clinical social worker with a wide range of experiences in child welfare, adoption, community mental health, substance abuse, out-patient psychotherapy and wellness programming. She became a Public Health Advisor with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in 2008 and currently serves as the coordinator for the Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant Program.

MentalHealth.gov

Launched in mid-2013, this website serves as a portal for mental health information and help resources.  Its goal is to inform the public, first responders, schools, policymakers, governments, businesses  and communities.  Content is contributed by the CDC, NIH/NIMH and SAMHSA.

Creator: 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
Publisher: 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
Contributor: 
CDC, NIH, SAMHSA
Date published: 
2013
Full Text Online: 
Yes
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