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Media guidelines for bullying prevention

These guidelines for bullying prevention were developed in partnership with a wide range of behavioral health and media experts and provide recommendations for media coverage of bullying.  The guidelines are designed to provide journalists, members of the entertainment industry, bloggers, and others with the up-to-date, accurate information needed to cover and depict bullying issues in a factual and sensitive way.

Creator 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Publisher 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes

Beyond Rhetoric: Does It Get Better?

Stephen Russell, University of Arizona, Member, SPRC Steering Committee
Guest Columnist

Everything changed when the attention of the media was captured by several highly visible youth suicides that seemed to be directly linked to homophobic bullying. Suddenly the public was aware of LGBT youth and bullying, as well as the implications of bullying for mental health and suicide. This has been a major cultural shift from silence (arguably denial) to dramatic public, media, and celebrity attention. The good news is that people are finally paying attention to the pervasive homophobia that has been undermining the well-being of LGBT youth for generations. The dilemma with such public attention is that it can provide simplistic frames of understanding of complex challenges.

One simplification, and a dangerous one, is the idea that bullying can cause suicide. Suicide and self-harm are complex problems. Nearly all cases in which a young person thinks about or engages in suicidal behavior are the results of the complex interactions of multiple risk factors. The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) points out that the term “bullycide” and sensational media coverage that suggests an oversimplified cause-and-effect relationship between bullying and suicide may undermine the ability of bullied youth to imagine positive resolutions.

Another simplification is that “it gets better.”  A single well-intentioned video with this message went viral and became a social media phenomenon, inspiring entertainment stars, politicians, and professional sports teams to create video messages of hope for LGBT youth.

With support from the AFSP, I investigated the question of whether it actually gets better. I found that suicide risk for LGBT youth seems to be highest during the teenage years. But it doesn’t just “get better.” Many youth have criticized this message. The youth-driven Make It Better Project presents an alternative to this view. LGBT teens don’t want to wait until adulthood, muddling through, assuming that the teenage years are simply, by definition, homophobic. The teen years are a time of heightened concerns about conformity, especially related to gender expression and sexuality. But these developmental changes are why we need strategies to promote discussion of issues related to gender and sexuality – as well as mental health, depression and suicide – in ways that are authentic and promote healthy development. Everyone wants to prevent bullying and suicide. We need less rhetoric and fewer catchy phrases, and more real conversations about the reality of teens’ lives.

Resources

Suicide and Bullying Issue Brief (SPRC)

Bullying and Suicide (American Foundation for Suicide Prevention)

Make It Better Project
 

TAP 33: Systems-level implementation of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT)

Describes core elements of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) programs for people with or at risk for substance use disorders. Describes SBIRT services implementation, covering challenges, barriers, cost, and sustainability.

Creator 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Publisher 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes

A Strategic Approach to Suicide Prevention in High Schools

Monday, September 23, 2013 - 3:00pm - 4:30pm
EST

This webinar provided an overview of the research on school-based suicide prevention programs and identified resources that can be helpful in developing and implementing your own program.  In addition, it offered examples of how two states developed programs to prevent suicide in a variety of school systems, including those serving ethnically diverse students. While this webinar focused on high schools, some of the information may be applicable to any grade level.  

Objectives: In this webinar, participants working to prevent suicide learned how to:

  • Explain how a strategic approach to suicide prevention can be used in high schools
  • Identify resources for use as part of a strategic approach (e.g., BPR, NREPP, “Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools”)
  • Describe the efforts of two states to be strategic and culturally-appropriate in their approach to school-based suicide prevention.

Webinar Recording: A Strategic Approach to Suicide Prevention in High Schools
 

Additional Resources:

This video features Kentucky school principals, staff and parents who have experienced suicide loss, including suicide contagion in the school, and steps schools can take to reduce suicide and suicide attempts among their students. This video can be used with staff training, but is not appropriate for youth or children. To access a copy of the video itself, please contact Jan Ulrich (jan.ulrich@ky.gov).

 

Event Contact
Lieu Dominique
Presenter(s) 
Phil Rodgers, PhD, Evaluation Scientist, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
Chris Miara, MS, Director of Operations and Resources, Suicide Prevention Resource Center
Patricia Breux, RN, BSN, Youth Prevention Specialist, Suicide Prevention Center of New York State
Jan Ulrich, State Suicide Prevention Coordinator, Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health
Patti Clark, MBA, CPS, Project Coordinator, Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health
Moderator 
Rosalyn Blogier, LCSW-C, SAMHSA Public Health Advisor
Presenter Biographies 

Philip Rodgers, PhD, is an Evaluation Scientist for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. For the past nine years, he has managed the Best Practices Registry for Suicide Prevention in collaboration with the Suicide Prevention Resource Center. The Best Practices Registry provides a listing of suicide prevention programs, policies, tools, and materials, which have been reviewed and approved by experts in the field. Dr. Rodgers has given numerous presentations and workshops regarding suicide prevention and the evaluation of suicide prevention programs. He earned his undergraduate degree in experimental psychology from California State University Los Angeles and his doctorate in research and evaluation methodology from Utah State University.

Chris Miara, MS, is a Senior Project Director at the Education Development Center, Inc., with many years’ experience planning, implementing, and evaluating government-funded programs to prevent injuries, violence, and suicide. She is Director of Operations and Resources at the Suicide Prevention Resource Center. In collaboration with the National Association of Mental Health Program Directors and with funding from SAMHSA, Ms. Miara also played a key role in the development of "Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools.

Pat Breux, RN, BSN, is the Youth Prevention Specialist at the Suicide Prevention Center of New York (www.PreventSuicideNY.org), which is an agency of the New York State Office of Mental Health Suicide Prevention Initiative.  In her role at the Center, she provides training, consultation and access to research and best practices in suicide prevention, intervention and postvention to schools and youth serving organizations across the state.  Her work in Chemung County received National recognition from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration with a Science and Service Award in 2008.  She received the Advocate of the Year Award from Families Together in NYS in 2009 and the Excellence in Education Award from the Western NY Chapter of American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in 2010.  She is a certified SafeTALK, CONNECT Postvention and QPR trainer, a Master Trainer of Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) and a provider of Lifelines trilogy of trainings.  She is the lead developer of “Creating Suicide Safety in Schools Workshop” which has been endorsed by the New York Association of School Psychologists.

Jan Ulrich is the State Suicide Prevention Coordinator with the Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities. Jan has been involved with suicide prevention and awareness efforts on a national, state and local basis since 2002, after the issue of suicide touched her family very personally.  She was a member of the Kentucky Suicide Prevention Group (KSPG) from 2002 to 2007, and served on the KSPG board for several years prior to her employment with BH/DID in 2007.  Jan has been a certified QPR Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Trainer since 2004 and a QPR Master Trainer (T4T).  She is a recipient of NAMI KY Prevention Partner Award, and Mental Health America of KY Advocacy Award for her work in suicide prevention.  Jan is also the founder of the Suicide Prevention Consortium of Kentucky (SPCK – Live Long).

Patti Clark, MBA, CPS, is currently the project coordinator for Kentucky’s Garrett Lee Smith Suicide Prevention Grant, under the Kentucky Division of Behavioral Health.  The Suicide Prevention Efforts for Adolescents in Kentucky focuses on suicide prevention efforts for youth and the families in the state with emphasis on school-based implementation, LGBTQ suicide prevention and resilience development, and suicide prevention for military personnel and their families. She is a certified prevention specialist.

Prior to working in suicide prevention, she was a project coordinator for Kentucky’s Underage Drinking Strategic Prevention Framework project in Owen County, Kentucky where binge drinking among high school youth was reduced by 36% over a two-year period. She is a SPF master trainer and co-wrote the evaluation portion of Kentucky’s SPF manual. She also teaches the needs assessment portion (Step 1) of Prevention Academy for the state.

Prior to her work in prevention, Patti was a newspaper publisher and community advocate, organizing a variety of events and activities and bringing together community members to address issues. 

She is a graduate of Eastern Kentucky University (BA Journalism) and Sullivan University (MBA). She is currently working on her Master of Divinity degree at Luther Rice University in Atlanta.

Rosalyn (Roz) Blogier, LCSW-C, is a licensed clinical social worker with a wide range of experiences in child welfare, adoption, community mental health, substance abuse, out-patient psychotherapy and wellness programming. She became a Public Health Advisor with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in 2008 and currently serves as the coordinator for the Garrett Lee Smith Campus Suicide Prevention Grant Program.

MentalHealth.gov

Launched in mid-2013, this website serves as a portal for mental health information and help resources.  Its goal is to inform the public, first responders, schools, policymakers, governments, businesses  and communities.  Content is contributed by the CDC, NIH/NIMH and SAMHSA.

Creator 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
Publisher 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)
Contributor 
CDC, NIH, SAMHSA
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes

Snapshots from the Safe Schools/ Healthy Students initiative

This snapshot highlights key characteristics of effective school mental health (SMH) and the strategies that 13 federally funded Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) grantees have used to build and sustain comprehensive mental health programs. Working with community mental health agencies, the SS/HS sites featured in this snapshot identified and mapped out needs and resources and provided effective mental health promotion, prevention, and treatment services. 

Creator 
Towvim L, Carney N, Thomas B, Repetti J, Roman L, Blaber C, Anderson K.
Publisher 
EDC
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes

Sequestration: The impact on the most at-risk population – Native youth

Describes the impact of cuts to federal programs serving native youth as a result of sequestration.  These include violence and substance abuse prevention programs as well as cuts to education, mental health services, public safety, and juvenile justice.

Creator 
Center for Native American Youth
Publisher 
Aspen Institute
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes

2013 Annual GLS Grantee Meeting

Format 
Face-to-face
Event date 
Tuesday, June 11, 2013 - 9:00am - Thursday, June 13, 2013 - 5:00pm
EST
Location 
Washington Marriott Wardman Park Washington, DC
Description 

The 2013 combined Campus/State/Tribal GLS Grantees' Annual Meeting.

Sponsors 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Event Contact
Michelle Carnes
(240) 276-1869

The Texas Suicide Prevention Symposium: Coming Together to Care 2013

Basics about Suicide 
Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Populations 
Military-Veterans
Survivors of Suicide Loss
Programmatic Issues 
Means Restriction
Postvention and Crisis Response
Settings 
School

Wednesday, July 10 - Symposium
National Strategies for Suicide Prevention - Jerry Reed, Education Development Center
Overview of Texas Suicide Prevention Initiatives - Jenna Heise, Texas Department of State Health Services
Safety Planning, Structured Follow-Up and Other Brief Interventions for Suicidal Individuals - Barbara Stanley, Columbia University
LOSS Team - Frank Campbell, LOSS Team and Jennifer Smith, Tarrant County MHMR
Suicide Prevention in the School Community - Frank Zenere, Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Why Means Matters - Catherine Barber, Harvard University
Postvention in Schools - Frank Zenere and Jenna Heise
Treating Trauma and Reducing Suicide Risk - Craig Bryan, University of Utah

Thursday, July 11 - Understanding PTSD for Military Members in Civilian Communities

SPECIAL POST SYMPOSIUM EVENT!
The Texas Governor's Commission for Women Presents: Understanding PTSD for Military Members in Civilian Communities - a workshop conducted by Craig Bryan, University of Utah

8:30 am - 12:30 pm at the Dallas Marriott at Las Colinas, Irving, Texas

Free CEUs and Nursing Contact Hours available for these events.

Event date 
Wednesday, July 10, 2013 - 8:30am - Thursday, July 11, 2013 - 12:30pm
CST

Sudden death: Risk for suicide among high school athletes

This issue of Well Aware Bulletin discusses suicide risk among student athletes and how the sports culture’s "tough it out" attitude can define social norms and expectations and compromise an athlete's outlook on reaching out for help. Those with predisposed vulnerabilities, such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, stress disorders, eating disorders, and substance use disorders may be at especially high risk. Also discusses what adults can do to best address this risk and keep young athletes safe. 
 

Creator 
Well Aware
Publisher 
Wyoming Department of Health, Public Health Division
Contributor 
Wyoming Department of Education
Date published 
2013
Full Text Online 
Yes
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